Sunchokes: What a Gas!

Sunchokes: What a Gas!

sunchoke

I was recently gifted the Zenbelly cookbook and absolutely love the recipes in the book. The book featured a recipe for sunchokes and I immediately knew I had to try them for the blog. I really had no idea what a sunchoke was, so I went digging (would I sound clever if I said pun intended?).

sunchoke

The sunchoke, also called the Jerusalem artichoke, is the root of a species of sunflower and isn’t part of the more common globe artichoke, despite the nomenclature. Some people nickname it the Fartichoke. And, let me tell you, that nickname is for a reason. I won’t go into too many details except that I tried only a small amount of roasted sunchoke and that was enough for me to feel the effects of the fartichoke.

sunchoke

If you’re able to tolerate it, the sunchoke is less, shall we say, potent? if it’s cooked than raw. I chose to roast the sunchokes in a similar way to the recipe in the cookbook. I read that it is also great in soups and was named “the best soup vegetable” at the 2002 Nice Festival for the Heritage of the French Cuisine. I hate to say it, but I won’t be trying sunchokes again anytime soon. Despite the un-pleasantries of the fartichoke, I wasn’t a huge fan of the taste of the sunchoke. Yes, it was creamier than a potato, but it had a very root-y taste. I’m not going to talk it down too much because I’d like for you to try yourself! Just do it on a day when you’ll be home for a few errrr-hours alone.

sunchokes

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